The History Of The Scandal Of Windrush

The end of a war that will leave its traces and scars on everyone’s heart all around the world. A world trying to rebuild itself, to get up after his trauma. Human beings who stand together, advance side by side towards a hope of peace and happiness. And in the midst of ruin in Europe, after the Second World War, there were people with tender hearts who were fighting for their survival, for future generations. They will rebuild, repair a country that is not theirs, they will put all their heart in it, and it will be adopted, to become an integral part of the history of this country. Because deep down what link can be stronger than the time? What else than the love that we offer? And the border of blood ties is finally broken by the heart of humanity which is the best justice that exists.

Nurses, doctors, builders, workers, thousands of faces who worked so that one day we can observe the sunrise of today’s England. A country that was wounded one day and found its heroes, its saviours. And then one day we wanted to forget history, we lost records, we lost a Database, a paper and we refused to remember, we rejected the reality of the past, we were overwhelmed by the hate, we have denied the love of England, which once was its strength, we let ourselves be carried away and we rejected part of the foundations of the post-war period.

Because the generation of Windrush is not just a handful of Caribbean that we can decide to deport, for whatever reason and even less without valid reasons.


I lift my pen to remind the United Kingdom and not only, that these English citizens that are not white enough or not European enough, to be recognize as they are, should be honoured for the work they have provided to this country these past 70 years.

Between 1948 and 1971 nearly 500,000 workers from Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and other Commonwealth's territories landed in the United Kingdom to fill a shortage of labour with the promise of the right to remain indefinitely on the territory, British territory. It was an official agreement, most of which were settled for decades, without imagining that the day would come or would call into question their presence in Britain, and that they would be considered as mere immigrants, to whom asks to leave the country. It is in 2010 that the Ministry of the Interior decides to destroy the landing cards of this generation, the reason being to protect their personal data.

Today, the incidence of this very bad management is such that we deny these citizens and their most fundamental rights, such as public health.


They are also expelled from their country, and considered as migrants. How far will we go to protect the rights of our fellow citizens?                   


Written by Kahina Foudad

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